Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for August, 2009

Peony is the name of the Chinese restaurant in the residents club of Discovery Bay, a development on Lantau Island. It’s only a 25 minutes sailing away from Central on HK Island.

Before, only members were allowed in but since some time now they also accept non-members. The bill has to be settled by credit card only. Members are billed via their membership card. So the place avoids handling cash. 

For the classic Dim Sum they change the menu every day with order sheets numbered from 1 to 4. So instead of offering an immense variety every day, they have not as many items on the menu but as the day after you can get a different choice, that’s not really a problem… unless you want to stick always to the same food.

Dim Sum is among Hong Kong finest food traditions

Dim Sum is among Hong Kong finest food traditions

They also offer other items that will change on a regular basis and of course the classic Chinese menu is available the whole year around.

Variable menu

Peony menu

Zhau Mei is one of our favourite teas when going for Dim Sum.
Zhou Mei

As pictures say more than a thousand words: enjoy some of our local Dim Sum specialities:

Discovery Bay 002

Discovery Bay 001

Dumplings

Dumpling

Peony Chinese Restaurant1bis

Dim Sum places can be very crowded;  however, as this one is mostly aiming at local resident club members you will never have long waiting queues at Peony. We are not members but do live nearby. That makes is very convenient.

If you are visiting Hong Kong and want a really high end Dim Sum place, I can recommend:

DIM SUM – The Art of Chinese Tit-Bits.

G/F, 63 Shing Woo Road, Happy Valley. HK Island. Tel:2834 4353

It’s a private restaurant, not one of those huge Dim Sum halls. Come early as there are only about 15 tables and the place has a very good reputation.

I’ll get the location on the map for you:

Read Full Post »

A real classic in the traditional  Belgian Cuisine.

I want to share one of the best classic recipes from the Flemish Belgian cuisine. A shame that here in Asia it’s almost impossible to get fresh North Sea grey shrimps, so this recipe is only meant to make you hungry.

Otherwise just buy some airline tickets to Belgium and savour this fine food in one of the many restaurants in Brussels, Antwerp, Ghent, Bruges or at the coast.

But do pay attention: you might become addicted to that dish as much as I’m addicted to Hokkien mee or Char Koay Teow when in Penang!

And now the recipe:

for about 10 croquettes: 1/2 kg fresh unpeeled grey shrimps, 50 g of flour, 1/2 liter milk, 50 g of butter, 1 egg yolk, 1/2 lemon, 50 g shredded Emmenthaler cheese, pepper and salt.

Before the final frying you will need extra flour, a few drops of vegetable oil, breadcrumbs.

When serving add deep fried parsley and a lemon wedge to the plate.

——————————————————

First start with the hardest part of the job: Peel the shrimps and keep both the heads and shells/carcasses apart.

 

Grijze Garnalen

Heat up the milk with the shrimp heads and shells. When it reaches its boiling point, turn off the fire and let the shrimps’ taste impregnate the milk during half an hour. Sieve the milk and keep aside. (Réserver).

Make a white roux with butter and flour + pepper and salt. Make sure that it doesn’t get burned sticky on the bottom of the pan! So: keep stirring.  

Mix the milk with the roux to obtain some kind of non liquid dough. Keep stirring. Remove the pot from the fire after 5 minutes and add the juice of half a lemon, the egg yolk, the shrimps, the cheese, pepper and salt. Mix that dough.

Butter a metallic plate and transfer the dough on it. Spread the dough on the plate till a thickness of about 2 cm. Cover with a plastic foil and put in the fridge for the night.

Next day you either cut rectangular croquettes or roll traditional cylindrical croquettes. Use a shaker,  a whisk or two forks to beat the egg whites. Beat till foamy but still liquid.  Next pull the croquettes through some flour, then through the egg whites and finally through a plate of breadcrumbs.

Deep fry till golden, frying temp. at 180 degrees Celsius. It will only take a few minutes. When ready put the croquettes on some kitchen tissue to allow absorbing most of the oil.

Deep fry the parsley for about 10 seconds . Dress the croquettes, parsley and a wedge of lemon on a warm plate . Before eating sprinkle  lemon juice over the croquettes. 

Grey Shrimp Croquette filled with "Crevettes de Zeebrugge"

Grey Shrimp Croquette filled with "Crevettes de Zeebrugge"

A chilled dry white wine is recommended to keep this dish company. Think Chablis, Sancerre or a light Muscadet sur Lie.

Bon appétit!

 

 

Read Full Post »

De Oesterput (oyster pitt) is very well known by a few in Belgium. It’s in Blankenberge, a popular seashore town along the Belgian coast. It’s a typical family holiday place, not fancy like Knokke… just a place where the hard working commoner family goes on holiday since the early 50ties.

I know my parents went there since I was a baby. Every year. Again and again. Probably that’s why, when I grew up I only very rarely visited the place again. However, last year when my wife and I returned to Belgium for a family visit, we also took a trip to the Belgian coast. (68km of North Sea coastline: yup… that’s Belgium… a HUGE country -grin-)

BlankenbergeBlankenberge, West-Flanders.

Anyway, we had lunch at the Oesterput with some great seafood: Dutch Zeeland flat oysters which are definitely the best in the world, unfortunately also the most expensive;

OestersZeeuwse platte Oesters. The best in the world. Because of these little animals I’ll forgive the Dutchies for being Dutch!

Mjam!

Soupe de poissonsFish soup with rouille. We both loved it. Wonderful dish.

And another speciality from Flanders: Garnaalkroketten -> think  gray shrimp croquettes, dipped in egg-white and bread crumbs, then deep fried in oil. I’ll post the recipe in a future cooking post but just forget about cooking this in Asia, as there sadly is no way to buy those North Sea grey shrimps here!

croquettesA Classic with Capital C in Flanders’ cuisine.

 

IMG_0389bis

If you want the real stuff: catch a flight to Belgium to enjoy them. Just don’t tell me, as I would turn green and have a tantrum out of jealousy!

Oesterput1Behind the windows in the back are 4 large basins where they keep life lobsters and oysters. It used to be an open space but due to health and safety reasons they had to separate the basins from the restaurant with those windows. People call that progress but I preferred the charm from before!

Oesterput Blankenberge

Oesterput restaurant

 

Port of Blankenberge

Website of this place: http://www.oesterput.com/

Although they announce 4 languages on their home page, English and German is still unavailable. Sorry for that. If you want to read, you’ll have to stick to Dutch or French!

 

Read Full Post »

Being both customer and judge doesn’t make us foodies as if we were having a PhD in that inexact science called Epicurean Gourmetology. Admit it, we just are not objective when it comes to food. Our upbringing, our cultural inheritance, our traditions and also our instinctive aversion of some exotic dishes do play tricks on us.

Hawker centres however have a huge advantage with their many stalls to allow you always to find that yummy dish among the large choice on offer. There are so many hawker centres in Penang that it would be impossible to try them all.

We all have our preferences because of that one famous stall in that one particular hawker centre that serves that one famous dish that we consider our favourite.

Goodall

Goodall Food Court

Goodall Food Court is quite large, situated at the corner of Jalan Scott and Jalan Gottlieb. Very convenient for us as it’s very close to our house in Penang. My favourite cockles cooked in a hot and spicy sauce are found here.

 cockels

Also the satay stall offers very high quality, although I do agree that it’s maybe a very easy dish to cook.

 Satay

My wife also likes the Poh Piah sold here

 Poh Piah

while her mom says the Durian seller has great quality and is also very inexpensive.

Durian

(Regarding the stall that sells chicken wings and bisshop’s noses: not as good as the one on Gurney drive’s Song River Food court.)

Here is the one on Gurney drive:

Song River food court

Read Full Post »

This place is situated at the seashore in Tanjung Tokong, next To Tua Peh Kong Temple. They serve Egg crab, Meat crab, Sand/Flower crab, cockle sheels, fried squid, fried shells, fried noodles / rice / vegetables.  There is also a little stall selling very good quality Malay satays.

We ordered meat crab simply cooked on the BBQ. It’s that way I always prefer eating crab, lobster or langoust (rock lobster) as the meat gets impregnated with some smoky taste through the shell.

While waiting for the crabs to be cooked we had some satay skewers (Chicken and beef) with the traditional shallots and cucumber and the obvious  satay sauce.fishingA bit further along a dam into the sea some people were fishing with a rod and deeper in the bay there was a small fish farm.

small fish farmFish farmYummy traditional Malay sataySatay

CrabThat’s how I like my crab. 

 In fact this place is a prime location and relatively unknown by the tourists. Only locals and we were enjoying the seafood and the view.

After finishing our plates we  had to clean up a bit. Tapwater bassins were available to wash up. No need for soap as there were lots of chopped pieces of green lemons available to clean our smelly hands!

As for the price: 1kg of meat crab for 40 ringit sounds like a good deal.

Read Full Post »

mosselen

What makes a country, the size of Maryland, famous?

The bickering between Flemings and Walloons?  Its 6 (yes six) governments?  Being the Capital of Europe? Its chocolate and beer?              For me, it’s their fast food stalls serving fritten (fries) with different sauces and/or beef stew, chicken stew, satay skewers…

However the national dish in Flanders is not one to be found in that “fritkot” (fries-barrack) but in restaurants or at home: Mussels & fries.

The mussels come from Holland’s Yerseke and the Easter-Scheldt. There is a rumour that the Dutchies sell up to 70% of their annual mussel harvest to Belgium.

The cooking is very simple. No need for specials> Just wash the mussels 2 or 3 times in fresh water, then transfer them to a big pot. 

Chop lots of onions, lots of celeri and parsley; add white pepper. Put the pot on a high fire and pour some dry white wine in the casserole. Once the mussels open they’re ready to be eaten. Serve in deep soup plates and don’t forget to drink the bouillon as well.

As for the fries: deep fry them the Belgian way: first 3 or 4 minutes at 150 Celsius. Afterwards let them rest for 1/2 hour and finish frying them at 180 degrees Celsius till crisp.

Hint for the fries: use potatoes that are very low on sugar. “Bintjes” are the best but unfortunately not on offer all over the world. BTW, if no good potatoes available just serve the mussels with buttered bread. In fact, I personally prefer it that way.

Bon appetit!

mussels

Read Full Post »